Arcive of some 2012 Stories

Newton High School Interact Club Announcement (Dec 3, 2102)

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Newton High School Interact Advisor (Dec 3, 2012)

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World War II Verterans honored (Nov 12, 2012)

Pete Carter leads the Rotary Club of Covington to honor our veterans and specifically our World War II veterans for Veterans day.  Hugh Steele served in World War II along with two of his brothers.  Thank you to all of our veterans for their contribution to our country for Veterans Day.

Veterans honored on Covington the square

From every state represented by the 50 stars embedded in the American flag, current and retired members of the armed forces are honored for selflessly putting their lives at stake on the battlefield. In Newton County, residents came to the square Monday to honor and pay respect to the local veterans that fought for their county.

Dr. Doug Gilreath, senior pastor at Covington First United Methodist Church, opened the ceremony with prayer. Gilreath's father served in the military and Gilreath remembers traveling as a youth with his mother and siblings to Dobbins Air Force Base in their Volkswagen 43 years ago to welcome his father home from the Vietnam War.

"I remember that there was a rope there that we had to stand behind. I remember thinking to myself, when I see my dad there is no way this rope is going to hold me back...Sure enough that rope didn't hold us back...We held on to him like we had never held on to him before," says Gilreath.

"I am choosing today to remember my father's patriotism. I remember the pride that he passed on to all of his children and the respect he has for our country and our leaders."

The ceremony went on as Don Floyd, United States Coast Guard Veteran (1968-1979) recognized the Veterans of War World ll, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War and the global war on terror. Each veteran stood in memory of the hardships of combat, basic training and leaving behind loved ones, while a wreath was placed in honor and representation for those who lost their lives. Marion Banks, veteran captain (1966), closed in prayer.

At the head of the altar, the words "Do this in remembrance of me," symbolize how God gave his life for each person on this earth, much like those soldiers who fought unselfishly for this country.

Gilreath encouraged those present to pass on memories to others because they each have a story to share. He thanked them for their service, obedience and willingness to sacrifice their tomorrow for this country's.

"I choose to remember today, but I say to you take heart for this is a great country.

"My friends, there is power in remembering. Not remembering the small things...not struggling over the little things...I am talking about remembering something that it becomes real to us in this moment that we remember the experience...Our memories inspire us, and comfort us," Gilreath said.

As Gilreath's father told him, "A true soldier despises war, despises the conflict. The reason that we fought was because of the person beside us. We were willing to sacrifice our lives for them."

Covington News, November 12, 2012

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Middle Ridge Elementary Fall Festival (Nov 6, 2012)

The Rotary Club of Covington and the Interact Club of Eastside High School gave away over 1200 books during the festival.  Children and adults in our community were excited to have the opportunity to select many books from all genres.  The Rotary Club of Covington would like to thank the staff and coordinators of the Middle Ridge Fall Festival for a great time and a great opportunity to serve and support literacy in the community.
   
   
   
   
   
   

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Alcovy Interact Advisor LaToya Morgan

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Change the World Event 2012 (Oct 14, 2012)


The Rotary Club of Covington takes part in the "Change The World" event.


Change The World, Impact The Community" Day: "We are better together."
Saturday, October 13, 2012. This event is about being a community.

The purpose of Change The World is to collect for and bring awareness to local missions, a time to do community service projects and showcase to our community the services available in Newton County to better and enrich our lives. There are many opportunities available in Newton County to create healthy, well-rounded individuals so that we can be the strong, caring, loving people that follow the teachings of Jesus Christ. The event was held on the grounds at Covington First UMC, 1113 Conyers Street, Covington, Ga. 30014. Change The World Event

the Interact Club came out and helped at the Rotary Booth as part of our New Generations

The Rotary Club was a popular booth as we were giving free books away.

What could be more fun than to have boxes of books to go through

Looks like everyone had a good time at the Event

It was another successful event thanks to Nicole and her family

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Camp Sunshine at Camp Twin Lakes (Oct 8, 2012)


Camp Twin Lakes was started by Camp Sunshine 20 years ago after 10 years of moving from campground to campground because of their growth.

Our Tour was given by Mo who started Camp Sunshine and was instrumental of getting Camp Twin lakes started also. 
Camp Twin Lakes now host camp for 57 organizations and had 9000 Children last year from those organiztions.  they have 30 cabins with 12 beds each.

They have everything you could think of for activities for the children


An Awesome pool that starts at zero depth so a wheel chair could roll in

An indoor heated and air conditioned gym with a stage for for plays and entertainment
And of course lakes

They have a huge dining hall where they create great food for the campers


The kitchen staff has fed us a wonderful meal and have prepared 82,000 meals here.
Mo presented the Rotary Club original art of Camp Sunshine created there for appreciation of our club.

what an amazing place for children.  they have overlooked nothing.  it was a great tour.


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20th Annual Cars of the Past Covington Car Show (Oct 8, 2012)
   

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Literacy Festival (Sep 23, 2012)

A special thanks to everyone who participated in the Literacy Festival of Newton County. The Rotary Club of Covington alongside the Interact Club of Eastside High School gave away nearly 1000 FREE books to families during the event. The R...

otary Club also collected nearly 100 stories and written entries on our "Never Ending Story" paper roll. The Interact Club of ESH worked hard to make an impact on the community and it worked! Great job and please come out to the "Covington Car Show on October 7th and the "Change The World" event on October 13th. The Rotary Club will continue to give-a-way free books as a part of the 2012 "1000-Pound" Book Give-A-Way. www.RotaryCovington.org

   
   
   

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New Generations Update (Aug 22, 2012)

August 22, 2012

Rotarian Nicole Fleming meets new Interact Club applicants at Eastside High School. Eastside received over 70 applications for membership into the Interact Club for the 2012-2013 school year. This is a record high according to Interact advisor, Ginger Boyter. Nicole Fleming is the New Generations Chair for the Rotary Club of Covington, which comprises service related initiatives for youths 12-30 years of age.

The school bell rang and this computer lab quickly filled with over 30 hopeful Interact club members for the 2012-2013 school year at Eastside H.S. Another 40 applicants were not able to attend this review meeting, but have committed to serving through Rotary's New Generations program for youths ages 12-18 - The Interact Club. The Interact hopefuls have a goal to Serve More & Learn More!

The ESH Interact club has a robust community service plan for the 2012-2013 school year that includes Service at the Special Olympics

· Sending letters to soldiers for the holidays

· Serving at the Benton House

· Serving at the Literacy Festival of Covington

· Helping with the 60-year old Covington Rotary Stocking Stuffer Project during the holidays

· fundraising Projects

· Environmental Projects and more……

These young men and women exemplify the future of our society and take pride in service above self. If you would like any information about how youths can become involved with Rotary, feel free to send our New Generations Chair an email at NewGenerations@RotaryCovington.org

What would it take to change the world? www.Rotary.org

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Police chief named Rotarian of the Year (July 19, 2012)

PHOTO HERE

Covington Public Safety Director Stacey Cotton received the 2012 E.G. Lassiter Rotarian of the Year Award from the Rotary Club of Covington.

 

Outgoing Club President Brook Collins presented the award at their weekly meeting in Covington.

"Stacey exemplifies Rotary's belief in service above self," stated Collins.

Cotton's acts of service in 2012 include organizing the Newton County High School Football championship trophy and Covington's Top Ten Banquet honoring high school seniors. In addition, Stacey brought many interesting and informative programs to the club. For 2012, Stacey has taken on another important project, the Rotary Empty Stocking Fund.

In attendance were Stacey's wife, Lana, son Kyle, his father, Honorable Stacey W. Cotton (retired) and his mom, Suzanne. Also on hand for the presentation was current Rotary president Wayne Pugh.

July 19, 2012
Covington News

GRSP Student Pazindu arrives (Jul 27, 2012)

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Retired general talks new U.S. focus (May 22, 2012)


Retired Lt. Gen. John M. Brown III spoke to Kiwanis members Tuesday about the future of the U.S. Military.

While the country remembers its veterans this weekend, retired Lt. Gen. John M. Brown III spent Tuesday focusing on what lies ahead for the U.S. Military, specifically a more increased focus on the Asia-Pacific region.

Brown, the brother-in-law of local community leader Doug Bolton, spoke at the combined luncheon of the Covington Kiwanis and Rotary clubs, using his experience as former commander of the U.S. Army's Pacific forces to paint a picture of the world ahead.

President Barack Obama unveiled his new military strategy in January, which called for an increased emphasis in the region, while simultaneously reducing the overall size of the American military from 570,000 to 490,000 and reducing military's $525 billion budget.

"We have a war going on in the Middle East, and we just wrapped up another war over there, and we're talking about problems all over the world, (so) why is the U.S. going to focus on the Asia-Pacific region? I'll try to describe what I think the reasoning is," Brown said.

He said today's army is still focused on winning the War on Terror and combating al-Qaeda's growth, but he noted that there are terrorist forces in the Pacific and that the U.S. needs to be able to be a force in multiple parts of the world, though the new strategy will no longer include multiple ground wars.

Brown said the Asia-Pacific region covers 50 percent of the earth's surface and has 60 percent of the world's population in its 36 nations and the U.S. trade conducts a third of its overall trade in the region. For comparison, 20 percent of U.S. trade is conducted with the European Union.

In addition, Brown said the region has seven of the 10 largest military forces in the world, and the five of the U.S.'s seven peace treaties are with Pacific countries, including Australia, Philippines, Japan, South Korea and Thailand.

And while China's growth and militaristic expansion is of great significance, when asked, Brown said he believed the U.S.'s next major military action could be against North Korea.

"It is a failing regime, you see it on the news, they're starving most of their people and it's very, very difficult to predict and understand the actions they're going to take," Brown said. "They have used provocations and attacks on South Korea to divert attention away from their failings."

While the U.S. has been able to convince South Korea to not retaliate, Brown that the strong U.S. ally has gotten to the point where it might "finally strike back." While the combined U.S. and South Korean forces would "mop them (North Korea) up", the civilian casualties could be large.

As for China, despite the fact the country spends a reported $95.6 billion on its military (though experts say that number could be more than $160 million), Brown said the country has huge social hurdles to overcome and can't yet deploy its military far outside of its borders. Of course, the country does continue to improve its military and has built strong connections in other countries by having its military build infrastructure free of charge.

Finally, Brown spoke of the need for the U.S. to focus more on developing the quality of its forces and its potential troops. He said 75 percent of people who walk into recruiting offices are not qualified to serve in the military, including 38 percent who are too obese or have another physical disability, 18 percent with illegal drug offenses, 10 percent who cant' meet the mental qualifications, 6 percent who have too many children (dozens in some cases) under the age of 18 and 5 percent with other criminal offenses.

"That doesn't make me very proud as an American and makes me fearful as a soldier and is something we need to address as a nation," Brown said.

He also called on the country to properly equip its troops, stop committing troops to wars without officially declaring war and stop piling up debt to pay for such wars, as has happened in the Middle East. If the county declares war and fully supports those efforts, the U.S. will continue to be successful in its military actions in the decades to come.

While the country remembers its veterans this weekend, retired Lt. Gen. John M. Brown III spent Tuesday focusing on what lies ahead for the U.S. Military, specifically a more increased focus on the Asia-Pacific region.

Brown, the brother-in-law of local community leader Doug Bolton, spoke at the combined luncheon of the Covington Kiwanis and Rotary clubs, using his experience as former commander of the U.S. Army's Pacific forces to paint a picture of the world ahead.

President Barack Obama unveiled his new military strategy in January, which called for an increased emphasis in the region, while simultaneously reducing the overall size of the American military from 570,000 to 490,000 and reducing military's $525 billion budget.

"We have a war going on in the Middle East, and we just wrapped up another war over there, and we're talking about problems all over the world, (so) why is the U.S. going to focus on the Asia-Pacific region? I'll try to describe what I think the reasoning is," Brown said.

He said today's army is still focused on winning the War on Terror and combating al-Qaeda's growth, but he noted that there are terrorist forces in the Pacific and that the U.S. needs to be able to be a force in multiple parts of the world, though the new strategy will no longer include multiple ground wars.

Brown said the Asia-Pacific region covers 50 percent of the earth's surface and has 60 percent of the world's population in its 36 nations and the U.S. trade conducts a third of its overall trade in the region. For comparison, 20 percent of U.S. trade is conducted with the European Union.

In addition, Brown said the region has seven of the 10 largest military forces in the world, and the five of the U.S.'s seven peace treaties are with Pacific countries, including Australia, Philippines, Japan, South Korea and Thailand.

And while China's growth and militaristic expansion is of great significance, when asked, Brown said he believed the U.S.'s next major military action could be against North Korea.

"It is a failing regime, you see it on the news, they're starving most of their people and it's very, very difficult to predict and understand the actions they're going to take," Brown said. "They have used provocations and attacks on South Korea to divert attention away from their failings."

While the U.S. has been able to convince South Korea to not retaliate, Brown that the strong U.S. ally has gotten to the point where it might "finally strike back." While the combined U.S. and South Korean forces would "mop them (North Korea) up", the civilian casualties could be large.

As for China, despite the fact the country spends a reported $95.6 billion on its military (though experts say that number could be more than $160 million), Brown said the country has huge social hurdles to overcome and can't yet deploy its military far outside of its borders. Of course, the country does continue to improve its military and has built strong connections in other countries by having its military build infrastructure free of charge.

Finally, Brown spoke of the need for the U.S. to focus more on developing the quality of its forces and its potential troops. He said 75 percent of people who walk into recruiting offices are not qualified to serve in the military, including 38 percent who are too obese or have another physical disability, 18 percent with illegal drug offenses, 10 percent who cant' meet the mental qualifications, 6 percent who have too many children (dozens in some cases) under the age of 18 and 5 percent with other criminal offenses.

"That doesn't make me very proud as an American and makes me fearful as a soldier and is something we need to address as a nation," Brown said.

He also called on the country to properly equip its troops, stop committing troops to wars without officially declaring war and stop piling up debt to pay for such wars, as has happened in the Middle East. If the county declares war and fully supports those efforts, the U.S. will continue to be successful in its military actions in the decades to come.

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Rotary District 6910 Conference Sandcastle Building Winner (May 15, 2012)